Thread: MLB News

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Yeah, we Roto GMs don't care nearly as much about LH bullpen arms as real GMs.  I think the dam will break when one of the ace pitchers signs.

And it sounds like Judge intends to have a contract signed by the end of the winter meetings.  So maybe we just have to wait it out the next 3-5 days.

Bob Elam Bob-in-TX

Looking forward to the winter meetings and some activity that doesn't involve relief pitchers.

Kent Ostby Seadogs

Does anyone have a suggestion for a website like Patton & Co for NBA Fantasy Roto league? Thanks

Joe Wrobel Chepelully
Oct 8

Here is a fascinating Washington Post article on the dicey relationship between the Athletic and the Times that bought it. I hope everyone can get by the pay-wall: https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/10/07/new-york-times-athletic-subscribers/

Walter Shapiro WShapiro
Oct 7

I actually fact-checked after posting below. Which is to say I opened up the business section of the print edition and turned to the sport section, starting on page B6, ending on page B8. 

Yep, no mention of today's schedule of games. But a long article by Tyler Kepner on the new format, a long article by Scott Miller on Fernando Tatis Jr., and a longish article by James Wagner about Max Scherzer and Adam Wainwright and their obsession with fantasy football.

As I wait for the Guardians to square off against the Rays at noon, I might even read all three.

Alex Patton Alex
Oct 7

The Times sports section does a glorious job covering...Premier League soccer. Baseball is another story. In contrast, the New York Post (for all the right-wing craziness of its news coverage) devoted 15 pages today to playoff previews. 

Walter Shapiro WShapiro
Oct 7

Whatever happened to the New York Times sports section? It's all but vanished.

Tyler Kepner resurfaces today with a nice overview of the next three days. Viewed online; the print edition doesn't even show who's playing today.

Welcome to the supersized Major League Baseball playoffs! For the first time following a 162-game season, the postseason field will include 12 of the 30 teams. Only two winning teams (Milwaukee and Baltimore) failed to make the cut.

The time for debating the format, though, is over. This weekend should be a whole lot of fun, with an all-new best-of-three wild-card round beginning in four cities on Friday.

The idea — besides generating revenue, of course — is to create a three-day baseball bonanza: You’ll have the excitement of the playoff openers on the first day, then nothing but elimination games on Saturday and Sunday.

The Friday four-pack starts at noon (all times Eastern) with baseball’s youngest team, the rebranded Cleveland Guardians, hosting the Tampa Bay Rays in a matchup of Shanes: Bieber for Cleveland, McClanahan for Tampa Bay.

At 2 p.m., the Philadelphia Phillies return to the playoffs to visit the team they met in their last appearance in 2011: the St. Louis Cardinals, who had Albert Pujols and Yadier Molina way back then, and still do today. Both will try to hold off retirement until November.

The Seattle Mariners’ postseason absence lasted a decade longer than the Phillies’, but they’re back for the first time since 2001, taking on the Blue Jays in Toronto at 4 p.m. That will be the first playoff matchup between the expansion cousins (both joined the league in 1977), and another first-ever playoff meeting comes in the nightcap, at 8, when the Mets host the San Diego Padres at Citi Field.


Alex Patton Alex
Oct 7

I don't like the "all 3 games are home games for the wildcard" rule. It sure seems like it would be good to give those teams at least one home game.  H-A-H for the winning team seems like it would be better. Probably done to keep the schedule tighter though.

Kent Ostby Seadogs
Oct 6

How did the union let this happen?

What the AP’s report does not delve into, however, are the other penalties associated with the luxury tax — which some teams view as more detrimental than the fiscal penalizations. Any club that exceeds the first tax threshold by $40MM or more will see its top pick in the following year’s draft pushed back 10 slots, for instance. With regard to the 2023 draft, that applies to both the Mets and the Dodgers.

Alex Patton Alex
Sep 21

I think the Mets are all in (see the Cano cut) but it will be interesting. I think the first cut is to look at all the teams that are well below the lowest luxory tax, these teams are really "cap free," meaning they are driven by their own internal numbers (say teams that are 20% or more below the first luxury tax threshold).

Kent Ostby Seadogs
Sep 21