Shin-Soo Choo Free Agent

Age: 38 (July 13, 1982) | 5' 11" | 210lbs. | Bats: Left OF-19 LF-16 RF-3 DH-14 PH-2
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
TEX AA 2016 6 20 0 6 3 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 .300 .417 .350 13 29 .462 n/a
TEX AAA 2016 3 11 2 6 1 0 1 0 1 5 1 1 .545 .583 .909 8 0 .500 n/a
TEX AL 2016 48 178 27 43 25 46 7 0 7 17 6 3 .242 .357 .399 12 22 .288 47/22/31 6 6
TEX AL 2017 149 544 96 142 77 134 20 1 22 78 12 3 .261 .357 .423 12 21 .305 49/25/26 21 21
TEX AL 2018 146 560 83 148 92 156 30 1 21 62 6 1 .264 .377 .434 14 24 .330 50/22/28 19 19
TEX AL 2019 151 563 93 149 78 165 31 2 24 61 15 1 .265 .371 .455 12 25 .333 49/22/29 22 22
TEX AL 2020 33 110 13 26 13 33 3 0 5 15 6 2 .236 .323 .400 10 26 .284 47/22/30 16 13
Career 16yrs 1652 6087 961 1671 868 1579 339 29 218 782 157 55 .275 .377 .447 12 22 .336 n/a
Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!

You have to be a subscriber to get at this, but Jason Collette does an excellent breakdown of Choo's revival at Rotowire this week. The link will take you there: http://www.rotowire.com/baseball/showArticle.htm?id=25368. But to read the whole thing you have to subscribe. 

Jason's point, in a nutshell (with plenty of graphs), is that Choo was hurt and struggled in 2014 and spring training in 2015, and then got overanxious early last year. His wife said something like, stop swinging so much, and he took her advice, and his second half was monster. 

Smart analysis and good news, I think.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Oct 19 '15

I don't see why the current rule is a problem. Let them play!

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Oct 17 '15

The amazing thing is this has never happened before, that anyone can recall.

The fix is simple. Dead ball when this happens (batter intentionally or unintentionally gets in the way of the catcher's throw back to the pitcher). The catcher has enough duties!

There's great still photo of the throw at BP.

http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=27687

Alex Patton Alex
Oct 17 '15

I don't think "the bat was out of the box" is relevant under the language of the rule; the rule talks about the batter being in the box. And, I'm not so sure intent is so hard to glean. Choo was clearly not looking at Russell, was stretching his arm (adjusting his sleeve), there's no way he intended to interfere with the throw. I would also suggest that the catcher has a duty to be careful with his throws, even as it is true that this happens so rarely.

mike fenger mike
Oct 17 '15

The argument at the time centered around: 1) if Choo's bat was out of the box when the throw hit it and 2) if Choo himself was out of the box. 

Based on that interpretation, I agree with Megary regarding the fact that the rule was correctly applied. But the rule stinks. It's next to impossible to prove intent unless it's blatant, and going forward I'd argue that anything more than incidental movement - intentional or no - and the ball should be ruled dead.

Mike Gianella MikeG
Oct 16 '15

"Over the plate" is a slight overstatement, but his left hand, with the bat in it, is extended close enough to the the plate that Martin's normal throw back to the pitcher is obstructed.

Was it intentional?

No! Clearly not. But just as clearly he obstructs Martin's normal throw.

So that's the question: does unintentional obstruction make it a dead ball?

LVW is absolutely right; it would never have happened if Choo had been allowed to collect himself out of the batter's box.

Sadly for the Rangers, but fortunately for baseball, Elvis Andrus made all this moot.

Alex Patton Alex
Oct 16 '15
The funny thing is it never would have happened if MLB hadn't added the staying in the batter's box rule. Choo would have been a couple of feet away without that rule.
van wilhoite LVW
Oct 16 '15

Picture from Fangraphs of Choo's position in previous AB when Martin threw the ball back to the pitcher:



Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Oct 15 '15

If Choo engineered Martin hitting the bat he did so making no overt movements. If he did engineer it, he laid a trap and waited patiently for something most of us couldn't even imagine ever happening, much less with a runner on third in a tied deciding playoff game. 

I'm with Megary on the position of the bat. Maybe above the inside line of the batters box. Not really close to the plate.


Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Oct 15 '15

Every image I have seen shows clearly that his bat was definitely NOT over the plate.  The bat may have been out of the batter's box...maybe.

His intention for extending his arms is his own, but his reaction after Martin's throw tells me he never thought about possible interference.

  

Gary Cruciani Megary
Oct 15 '15