Willie Mays San Francisco Giants

Age: 89 (May 06, 1931) | aka Say Hey | 5' 11" | 180lbs. | Bats: Right
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
NY1 NL 1951 121 464 59 127 57 60 22 5 20 68 7 4 .274 .356 .472 11 11 .279 n/a
NY1 NL 1952 34 127 17 30 16 17 2 4 4 23 4 1 .236 .326 .409 11 12 .245 n/a
NY1 NL 1954 151 565 119 195 66 57 33 13 41 110 8 5 .345 .411 .667 10 9 .325 n/a
NY1 NL 1955 152 580 123 185 79 60 18 13 51 127 24 4 .319 .400 .659 12 9 .282 n/a
NY1 NL 1956 152 578 101 171 68 65 27 8 36 84 40 10 .296 .369 .557 10 10 .281 n/a
NY1 NL 1957 152 585 112 195 76 62 26 20 35 97 38 19 .333 .407 .626 11 9 .324 n/a
SF NL 1958 152 600 121 208 78 56 33 11 29 96 31 6 .347 .419 .583 11 8 .344 n/a
SF NL 1959 151 575 125 180 65 58 43 5 34 104 27 4 .313 .381 .583 10 9 .299 n/a
SF NL 1960 153 595 107 190 61 70 29 12 29 103 25 10 .319 .381 .555 9 10 .319 n/a
SF NL 1961 154 572 129 176 81 77 32 3 40 123 18 9 .308 .393 .584 12 12 .296 n/a
SF NL 1962 162 621 130 189 78 85 36 5 49 141 18 2 .304 .384 .615 11 12 .286 n/a
SF NL 1963 157 596 115 187 66 83 32 7 38 103 8 3 .314 .380 .582 10 12 .309 n/a
SF NL 1964 157 578 121 171 82 72 21 9 47 111 19 5 .296 .383 .607 12 11 .268 n/a
SF NL 1965 157 558 118 177 76 71 21 3 52 112 9 4 .317 .398 .645 12 11 .286 n/a
SF NL 1966 152 552 99 159 70 81 29 4 37 103 5 1 .288 .368 .556 11 13 .279 n/a
SF NL 1967 141 486 83 128 51 92 22 2 22 70 6 0 .263 .334 .453 9 17 .283 n/a
SF NL 1968 148 498 84 144 67 81 20 5 23 79 12 6 .289 .372 .488 12 14 .302 n/a
SF NL 1969 117 403 64 114 49 71 17 3 13 58 6 2 .283 .362 .437 11 15 .313 n/a
SF NL 1970 139 478 94 139 79 90 15 2 28 83 5 0 .291 .390 .506 14 16 .303 n/a
SF NL 1971 136 417 82 113 112 123 24 5 18 61 23 3 .271 .425 .482 21 23 .339 n/a
SF NL 1972 19 49 8 9 17 5 2 0 0 3 3 0 .184 .394 .224 25 8 .205 n/a
NYN NL 1972 69 195 27 52 43 43 9 1 8 19 1 5 .267 .402 .446 18 18 .306 n/a
NYN NL 1973 66 209 24 44 27 47 10 0 6 25 1 0 .211 .303 .344 11 20 .242 n/a
Career 22yrs 2992 10881 2062 3283 1464 1526 523 140 660 1903 338 103 .302 .384 .557 12 12 .299 n/a
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The World Series MVP will now be known as the Willie Mays award.

van wilhoite LVW
Sep 30 '17

Willie was already in his 30s when I was old enough to watch, and obviously as I got older so did he. I was spoiled -- he made everything look so easy, it was only later that I realized how special he was. Plenty of great Mays stories are out there (for instance, he always said he'd made better defensive plays than The Catch); here's a nice one I found about baserunning specifically.

mike fenger mike
Jun 7 '17

It would. Hard to imagine anyone topping the Babe in 1920, unless it was the Babe in 1921.

But... since this is Willie's page... if we could go back and put the cameras on his every game, the way they capture every game now, and give him an accurate dWAR for every year, would Willie in fact earn the claim that some of us make -- stats be damned -- he was the greatest player of all time?

In addition to the impact he had in the field, there would be his baserunning excellence to factor in.

I was in Connie Mack Stadium on a Saturday afternoon when he struck out to end both games of a double-header as a pinch hitter. He had his failures at the plate.

Before he came to the Mets, I don't remember seeing him ever make a mistake on the bases. He must have, because he was so bold, but, caught-stealings aside, I never saw him get thrown out.

Alex Patton Alex
Jun 7 '17

Alex -- an interesting project in your "spare" time would be to go backwards in time and create value formulas for all historic seasons.  Would be great to look at the oldsters and see a guestimate at their roto value. 

You'd have to make decisions about team size/league size given fewer real-life teams per season.

Kent Ostby Seadogs
Jun 6 '17

Too bad we can't see Willie's G/L/F.

He'd have a better BABIP if he had struck out more often.

Alex Patton Alex
Jun 2 '17

Ah. Glad to hear it because Eduardo Perez is really good. Totally tuned into the moment, not worrying too much about the stats.

Alex Patton Alex
May 31 '17

THANKS for this!  Fantastic!

And ... I don't think it was a "local broadcast" ... I think it was ESPN ... Eduardo Perez is ESPN ... and the last time I watched a game online it was something similar ... a game in Miami with a focus on Puerto Rico ... with one of the in-booth guests being Eduardo's Dad Tony ... who was an honorary citizen of Puerto Rico (Pérez also played winter ball for 10 seasons between 1964–65 and 1982-83 in the Puerto Rico Baseball League for the Santurce Crabbers (Cangrejeros de Santurce). He won the batting title and was named league MVP in 1966-67.) ... it was fun and interesting ... just like you've described yesterday's broadcast ... good idea!

Howard Lynch LynchMob
May 31 '17

I watched the entire Giants-Cardinals game last night on MLB.

Why would I do that? Why stay up until 1:30 or so to watch a game in which I had the barest of rooting interest? (Yadier Molina in Doubt Wars)

Because the local broadcast that MLB picked up was offering a tribute to Willie Mays. Fascinating anecdotes, doled out each inning.

For instance, in the game in 1961 when Willie hit four home runs, Hank Aaron robbed him of a fifth. I probably knew that, but had forgotten.

Around the seventh inning Orlando Cepeda joined Eduardo Perez and the other guy in the booth. What was it like playing with Willie, Eduardo asked (of his Godfather)? Orlando shook his head. Eduardo pressed for more detail. Orlando remembered a time he hit a single with Willie on first and as he crossed first base himself, he looked to see if Willie had made it to third.

He wasn't there. He had scored.

Eduardo contributed a great anecdote of his own. After Willie's rookie year in 1951, he played winter ball in Puerto Rico. Eduardo was the bat boy. He remembers Willie giving fielding tips to a teenager just a few years younger than he was.

Roberto Clemente.

Many of the anecdotes came from Willie himself. Apparently Willie comes to almost all of the home games and they taped him for an hour and a half the day before.

Story after story after story in that high-pitched voice of his. It seemed like all 2992 games were still in his head as if they had been played yesterday. Just one example: when Joe DiMaggio hit a home run in the 1951 Word Series, Willie couldn't believe he was on the same field with his hero and broke into a smile. He just was glad it was different back then and he wasn't caught on camera.

How come Willie talked for an hour and a half the day before but didn't come into the booth today?

Because he's Willie.

Alex Patton Alex
May 31 '17