Joe Mauer Minnesota Twins

Age: 39 (April 19, 1983) | 6' 5" | 225lbs. | Bats: Left Minors: c-1 1b-90 of-1 rf-1 dh-33 ph-10
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
MIN AL 2004 35 107 18 33 11 14 8 1 6 17 1 0 .308 .369 .570 9 11 .300 n/a 5
MIN AL 2005 131 489 61 144 61 64 26 2 9 55 13 1 .294 .372 .411 11 12 .322 n/a 18
MIN AL 2006 140 521 86 181 79 54 36 4 13 84 8 3 .347 .429 .507 13 9 .364 n/a 27
MIN AL 2007 109 406 62 119 57 51 27 3 7 60 7 1 .293 .382 .426 12 11 .319 n/a 14 14
MIN AL 2008 146 536 98 176 84 50 31 4 9 85 1 1 .328 .413 .451 13 8 .342 n/a 22 23
MIN AL 2009 138 523 94 191 76 63 30 1 28 96 4 1 .365 .444 .587 13 10 .373 n/a 36 33
MIN AL 2010 137 510 88 167 65 53 43 1 9 75 1 4 .327 .402 .469 11 9 .348 n/a 22 23
MIN A+ 2011 7 23 3 6 3 1 2 0 1 6 0 0 .261 .346 .478 12 4 .238 n/a
MIN AL 2011 82 296 38 85 32 38 15 0 3 30 0 0 .287 .360 .368 10 11 .319 55/23/22 7 8
MIN AL 2012 147 545 81 174 90 88 31 4 10 85 8 4 .319 .416 .446 14 14 .364 53/25/22 26 25
MIN AL 2013 113 445 62 144 61 89 35 0 11 47 0 1 .324 .404 .476 12 18 .383 47/28/25 18 18
MIN A 2014 4 15 2 6 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 .400 .400 .400 0 7 .429 n/a
MIN AL 2014 120 455 60 126 60 96 27 2 4 55 3 0 .277 .361 .371 12 19 .342 51/27/22 13 13
MIN AL 2015 158 592 69 157 67 112 34 2 10 66 2 1 .265 .338 .380 10 17 .309 56/24/20 14 14
MIN AL 2016 134 494 68 129 79 93 22 4 11 49 2 0 .261 .363 .389 14 16 .301 52/27/21 10 12
MIN AL 2017 141 525 69 160 66 83 36 1 7 71 2 1 .305 .384 .417 11 14 .349 51/25/24 18 18
MIN AAA 2018 3 10 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 20 0.00 n/a
MIN AL 2018 127 486 64 137 51 86 27 1 6 48 0 1 .282 .351 .379 9 16 .330 51/27/22 11 13
Career 15yrs 1858 6930 1018 2123 939 1034 428 30 143 923 52 19 .306 .388 .439 12 13 .341 n/a
Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!

Baseball-Reference has an explanation of the old Monitor:

Hall of Fame Monitor

All-Time and Active Leaders

This is another Jamesian creation. It attempts to assess how likely (not how deserving) an active player is to make the Hall of Fame. Using its rough scale, 100 means a good possibility and 130 is a virtual cinch. It isn't hard and fast, but it does a pretty good job. Here are the batting rules.

Also, we require a minimum of 30 points in this metric before the value is displayed for a player.

  • For Batting Average, 2.5 points for each season over .300, 5.0 for over .350, 15 for over .400. Seasons are not double-counted. I require 100 games in a season to qualify for this bonus.
  • For hits, 5 points for each season of 200 or more hits.
  • 3 points for each season of 100 RBI's and 3 points for each season of 100 runs.
  • 10 points for 50 home runs, 4 points for 40 HR, and 2 points for 30 HR.
  • 2 points for 45 doubles and 1 point for 35 doubles.
  • 8 points for each MVP award and 3 for each AllStar Game, and 1 point for a Rookie of the Year award.
  • 2 points for a gold glove at C, SS, or 2B, and 1 point for any other gold glove.
  • 6 points if they were the regular SS or C on a WS winning team, 5 points for 2B or CF, 3 for 3B, 2 for LF or RF, and 1 for 1B. I don't have the OF distribution, so I give 3 points for OF (requires at least 82 games as the position).
  • 5 points if they were the regular SS or C on a Pennant-winning (but not WS winning) team, 3 points for 2B or CF, 1 for 3B. I don't have the OF distribution, so I give 1 points for OF (requires at least 82 games as the position).
  • 2 points if they were the regular SS or C on a Division winning team (but not WS or LCS winning), 1 points for 2B, CF, or 3B. I don't have the OF distribution, so I give 1 points for OF (requires at least 82 games as the position).
  • 6 points for leading the league in BA, 4 for HR or RBI, 3 for runs scored, 2 for hits or SB, and 1 for doubles and triples.
  • 50 points for 3,500 career hits, 40 for 3,000, 15 for 2,500, and 4 for 2,000.
  • 30 points for 600 career home runs, 20 for 500, 10 for 400, and 3 for 300.
  • 24 points for a lifetime BA over .330, 16 if over .315, and 8 if over .300.
  • For tough defensive positions, 60 for 1800 games as a catcher, 45 for 1,600 games, 30 for 1,400, and 15 for 1,200 games caught.
  • 30 points for 2100 games at 2B or SS, or 15 for 1,800 games.
  • 15 points for 2,000 games at 3B.
  • An additional 15 points if the player has more than 2,500 games played at 2B, SS, or 3B.
  • Award 15 points if the player's batting average is over .275 and they have 1,500 or more games as a 2B, SS or C.

Pitching Rules

  • 15 points for each season of 30 or more wins, 10 for 25 wins, 8 for 23 wins, 6 for 20 wins, 4 for 18 wins, and 2 for 15 wins.
  • 6 points for 300 strikeouts, 3 points for 250 SO, or 2 points for 200 or more strikeouts.
  • 2 points for each season with 14 or more wins and a .700 winning percentage.
  • 4 points for a sub-2.00 ERA, 1 point if under 3.00, in seasons in which surpassed 150 innings pitched.
  • 7 points for 40 or more saves, 4 points for 30 or more, and 1 point for 20 or more.
  • 8 points for each MVP award, 5 for a Cy Young award, 3 for each AllStar Game, and 1 point for a Rookie of the Year award.
  • 1 point for a gold glove.
  • 1 point for each no-hitter. This is not currently included.
  • 2 points for leading the league in ERA, 1 for leading in games, wins, innings, W-L%, SO, SV or SHO. Half point for leading in CG.
  • 35 points for 300 or more wins, 25 for 275, 20 for 250, 15 for 225, 10 for 200, 8 for 174 and 5 for 150 wins.
  • 8 points for a career W-L% over .625, 5 points for over .600, 3 points for over .575, and 1 point for over .550, min. 190 decisions.
  • 10 points for a career ERA under 3.00, min 190 decisions.
  • 20 points for 300 career saves and 10 points for 200 career saves.
  • 30 points for 1000 career games, 20 for 850 games and 10 for 700 games.
  • 20 points for more than 4,000 strikeouts, and 10 for 3,000 SO.
  • 2 points for each WS start, 1 point for each relief appearance, and 2 for a win.
  • 1 point for each LCS or LDS win.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Nov 30 '17

It's possible, I suppose, that the increased importance of analytics/sabremetrics/whatever, the predictive power of those artificial distinctions (between 99 Rs and 100 Rs) for the HOF will diminish.

Mike Dean TMU2009
Nov 30 '17

The interesting thing about the Monitor, from what I remember from the original, is that it is not whether a player should be inducted based upon performance, but rather, whether he is expected to be elected, based upon career contributions and how the voters have weighted those contributions in prior elections.

Based upon that and silly articles I've read over the years - yes, hitting .300 is worth something and hitting .299 is not.  100 RBI and Runs is worth something.  99 RBI and Runs is worth nothing.  If writers electing players consider those things as dividing lines, they should be counted for whether someone is expected to be elected.  And, every year we get articles about those things.

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Nov 30 '17

At the end of "The New Hall of Fame Monitor" in the new Bill James Handbook, Bill writes, "I will explain all the points in the new Hall of Fame Monitor in some other article somewhere; this is already by far the longest article in the almost thirty-year history of this book. I appreciate your staying with me."

Let me say somewhat sheepishly, I skimmed it. The analysis of present and future candidates at each position is interesting, but what I was mainly looking for was an explanation of the points in the new monitor.

"In general, if a player has more than 100 points in the Hall of Fame monitor by the end of his career, he probably will be selected to the Hall of Fame."

That's pretty neat. Roy Halladay, for example, ended with exactly 100 points in his career. Will he make the Hall? It's going to be close.

Tim Raines scored 99 points. And he finally squeaked in.

Which brings us to Joe Mauer. He so far has 89 points. When he was 25 (in 2008), he had 25 points. When he was 26, he had 50. When he was 27, he had 66. He was moving along like a house afire.

When he was 31, he had 83. When he was 32, he had 84. When he was 33, he had 85. Now, at 34, he's at 89.

He did something this year to gain four points toward election in the Hall of Fame. Really? I mean, it was a decent season, for Joe Mauer of late, but for a first baseman? Was he even above average in the AL?

His OPS+ was 116, which is pretty good. But Brandon Belt's was 117, and I doubt Bill thinks he's on a Hall of Fame track. What conceivably did Mauer do in 2014, when he was 31, to burnish his credentials, even by a point?

So I that's why I would like to see a complete list of the ingredients. Do you get a point, or two or three, for batting .300? But no points if you bat .299?

I look forward to seeing the recipe. And until then, we'll just have to say the meal itself is good.

Dick Allen, for instance, finished with 118 points. And we all know he should be in the Hall of Fame.

Alex Patton Alex
Nov 30 '17

3 more hits last night, including his 400th career double.

Since May 1st, Mauer is slashing .328/.409/.457.

So glad to see Mauer being relevant again.

I am really pulling for the Twins.

Keith Cromer Slyke
Sep 22 '17

All of the things Eugene said---oh, the peak was so good---plus the fact that Mauer is as genuinely nice a guy as they come.  And that, rightly or not, matters with voters.

I think he's deserving.  A couple more late .300 BA seasons wouldn't hurt.

Mike Landau ML-
Sep 9 '17
Aaron loves his Twins.
Keith Cromer Slyke
Sep 9 '17

I was anti-Mauer but Eugene and my boss Aaron Gleeman sold me on him a couple of years ago.

Mike Gianella MikeG
Sep 9 '17

Yes, these are merely accumulation years, but his peak was strictly at catcher and it was a hell of a peak.  His 7 best WAR years, all at C, were 5th all-time among catchers behind only Carter, Bench, Piazza, and Ivan Rodriguez, ahead of Fisk, Berra, Munson, Cochrane, and Posey who round out the top 10.

He's 10th in total WAR among players with a majority of games at C behind only Hall of Famers - Bench, Carter, IRod, Fisk, Berra, Piazza, Dickey, and Hartnett.  Mickey Cochrane, Buch Ewing, Ernie Lombardi are all behind him.  Ted Simmons too, who belongs in.

Luckily the voters are changing so the 136 (probably 155 when he retires) won't count too much against him.

I don't like a HOF with 24 RF and with only 15 C and 13 3B.  It just doesn't work for me.

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Sep 8 '17

I am a big Mauer guy, a favorite of mine...I even bought his jersey. But I can't see him being a HOF'er, even if he puts up the same numbers the next few years.

Love the OBP, but 136 HR's in 14 years...and he has almost played as much at 1B/DH as catcher.

Again, a big Mauer guy, but just can't see him sniffing Cooperstown.

Keith Cromer Slyke
Sep 8 '17