Joe Mauer Minnesota Twins

Age: 39 (April 19, 1983) | 6' 5" | 225lbs. | Bats: Left Minors: c-1 1b-90 of-1 rf-1 dh-33 ph-10
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
MIN AL 2004 35 107 18 33 11 14 8 1 6 17 1 0 .308 .369 .570 9 11 .300 n/a 5
MIN AL 2005 131 489 61 144 61 64 26 2 9 55 13 1 .294 .372 .411 11 12 .322 n/a 18
MIN AL 2006 140 521 86 181 79 54 36 4 13 84 8 3 .347 .429 .507 13 9 .364 n/a 27
MIN AL 2007 109 406 62 119 57 51 27 3 7 60 7 1 .293 .382 .426 12 11 .319 n/a 14 14
MIN AL 2008 146 536 98 176 84 50 31 4 9 85 1 1 .328 .413 .451 13 8 .342 n/a 22 23
MIN AL 2009 138 523 94 191 76 63 30 1 28 96 4 1 .365 .444 .587 13 10 .373 n/a 36 33
MIN AL 2010 137 510 88 167 65 53 43 1 9 75 1 4 .327 .402 .469 11 9 .348 n/a 22 23
MIN A+ 2011 7 23 3 6 3 1 2 0 1 6 0 0 .261 .346 .478 12 4 .238 n/a
MIN AL 2011 82 296 38 85 32 38 15 0 3 30 0 0 .287 .360 .368 10 11 .319 55/23/22 7 8
MIN AL 2012 147 545 81 174 90 88 31 4 10 85 8 4 .319 .416 .446 14 14 .364 53/25/22 26 25
MIN AL 2013 113 445 62 144 61 89 35 0 11 47 0 1 .324 .404 .476 12 18 .383 47/28/25 18 18
MIN A 2014 4 15 2 6 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 .400 .400 .400 0 7 .429 n/a
MIN AL 2014 120 455 60 126 60 96 27 2 4 55 3 0 .277 .361 .371 12 19 .342 51/27/22 13 13
MIN AL 2015 158 592 69 157 67 112 34 2 10 66 2 1 .265 .338 .380 10 17 .309 56/24/20 14 14
MIN AL 2016 134 494 68 129 79 93 22 4 11 49 2 0 .261 .363 .389 14 16 .301 52/27/21 10 12
MIN AL 2017 141 525 69 160 66 83 36 1 7 71 2 1 .305 .384 .417 11 14 .349 51/25/24 18 18
MIN AAA 2018 3 10 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 20 0.00 n/a
MIN AL 2018 127 486 64 137 51 86 27 1 6 48 0 1 .282 .351 .379 9 16 .330 51/27/22 11 13
Career 15yrs 1858 6930 1018 2123 939 1034 428 30 143 923 52 19 .306 .388 .439 12 13 .341 n/a
Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!
Seems to me Mauer himself has put an end to this debate. Where would the Twins be without him? As their catcher.
Alex Patton Alex
Sep 24 '08
Can't we all just get along?
Brian Sietsema steim
Feb 24 '08
Eug...sorry, replacement level is my mantra...VORP is god. But the only point where positional crap happens, it happens here. Mauer is a handful of Chico walker at bats better than the replacement level catchers.

But...if he went to a non-catcher position where he played more games and upped his power numbers...that's not a guess of course, catchers usually benefit when moved off the plate...he'd make more raw numbers...that's what we look for.

If you continue to talk about sabremetric definitions...I will talk about them as well. Quad A is so totally out of this discussion that I don't even get what you are trying to say.
Steve Parsons stevep
Feb 18 '08
I think the problem is that you don't accept the sabermetric definition of replacement level. Replacement level is defined as the quality of player that is available in the market to replace the player- essentially a Quad A type player in the minors. I use it in Rotisserie to define the player who is available on the free agent list.

Baseball Prospectus calculates marginal wins above replacement player. The replacement player at thirdbase is considerably better than the replacement player at catcher, both in real baseball and in Rotisserie. When measured against this level of player, Mauer is not replaceable. When defense is included he's far superior to every other AL catcher. Put him at third, and he's slightly ahead middle of the pack with far fewer marginal wins above replacement. A team interested in winning wants to maximize the differential between their players and the replacement level player. If the Twins get an average thirdbaseman and have the best catcher, that's far superior to Mauer at 3B and a replacement level catcher in terms of actual wins.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Feb 16 '08
Eugene,
I appreciate your display of rhetoric. Unfortunately my point is that he is a good real ball player, but as such OUGHT to put in a place where he is likely contribute more. A team that is serious about winning would take him out from behind the plate, where he creates fewer runs scored and doesn't create that many extra defensive outs....plus has his relatively low outs creation at bat minimized by his low PT. And put him in a place where they get another 100-150 ABs from him, plus probably effects their defense quite a lot more.

Don't get me wrong. He's a heckuva a lot better catcher (combo offense and defense) than any Molina you care to name. But a REAL team, a team that actually has pretensions to winning, would gt him out of there because he's going to generate a heckuva a lot more wins playing the extra 20-30 games. And he's going to be able to play defense almost anywhere short of the outfield.

In real value....he's a sort of plus catcher and not a major player. That's true. He's a bit better in fantasy...but still awfully replaceable.
Steve Parsons stevep
Feb 16 '08
So, stevep, you've been arguing he's not valuable as a real life player so he should be moved to thirdbase. Now that it appears I've won that argument, you think he isn't a valuable "fantasy" player.

I think I said originally, let's not confuse roto value with real value. In real baseball he's one of the most valuable players in the league and that's because his position is a big help, not a harm.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Feb 8 '08
I agree with the people that are saying they wouldn't bid 21 on Mauer. The injuries and lack of power are the 2 main reasons. He could find the pwer stroke but I see him topping out in the 15HR range. With all of that being said I do think people will bid over $21 for him and shouldn't part of your bid limits be inclusive of how high you will go on players you have no interest in but will bid to a certain point to bleed moeny out of your competition?
Ryan Murphy Rjm576
Feb 8 '08
Eugene, it's your call of course. But in Fantasy, a good BA guy with 86-13-84 in a career year is a solid contributor. a 62-7-60 guy hitting .293 is replaceable. Particularly one with an injury track record.

None of that nears, for a fantasy player, a prime position. Martin, VMart, Posada, McCann are obviously better I think, and he's not measurably better than 10 or so other cacthers unless he performs at the career level, even then he's barely top 5. The point is not whether he is a good 'real' hitter and catcher. He is, of course. But he's pretty replaceable as a fantasy player. Particularly at the price you are going to pay.

Steve Parsons stevep
Feb 5 '08
"That's incredibly replaceable"
I'd like you to find the number of catchers who between 1980-2007 who have 300 career games at catcher, an OPS of over .800 and and OPS+ of 120 or higher. There are only 5. That seems incredibly un-replaceable to me. Add in that he's a very good defensive catcher and the list is trimmed even more.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Feb 3 '08
Eugene, I recommend that you reread what I said, and the dates of the Boston writers comments, and so on.

Again, Mauer has very little power, and very little hope of power beyond the usual for replacement level catchers. That does not make him a bad player, but it means that the Twins would be best served by getting him into more games and to stop play slap and tickle. More strikeouts do not necessarily equal more outs. They just don't. Were Mauer to be more agressive, add a couple of points to his average and a chunk to his slugging along with getting 100-200 more at bats....well sorry, Marginal Wins Above Replacement isn't going to equal that.

Right now he is a 7-60-60 .800 OPS guy who might play 130 games. That's incredibly replaceable. And he has so much more ability than that. The question is how to get that out of him.

FWIW Boggs left Boston after 1992 and was trashed roundly as was...for instance Clemens. We know, or ought to know what to do with the ex post facto nonsense. and to anticipate...the difference between Mauer and Boggs is about 30 games a year, 50 or 60 points of OBP, 10-15 doubles and 20-40 runs. And quite a lot of slugging.
Steve Parsons stevep
Feb 3 '08