Harrison Bader St. Louis Cardinals

Age: 27 (June 03, 1994) | 6' 0" | 195lbs. | Bats: Right OF-49 CF-49 PH-23 PR-7
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
STL AAA 2017 123 431 74 122 34 118 18 1 20 55 15 9 .283 .347 .469 7 25 .345 n/a
STL NL 2017 32 85 10 20 5 24 3 0 3 10 2 1 .235 .283 .376 5 26 .288 44/16/39 2 2
STL NL 2018 138 379 61 100 31 125 20 2 12 37 15 3 .264 .334 .422 7 30 .358 40/27/33 17 17
STL AAA 2019 16 63 23 20 8 16 3 0 7 15 3 0 .317 .427 .698 11 21 .325 n/a
STL NL 2019 128 347 54 71 46 117 14 3 12 39 11 3 .205 .314 .366 11 29 .268 38/17/44 7 8
STL NL 2020 50 106 21 24 13 40 7 2 4 11 3 1 .226 .336 .443 10 32 .317 41/15/44 9 9
STL NL 2021 89 319 32 79 26 72 16 1 12 43 6 4 .248 .309 .417 7 21 .283 43/14/43 10 9
Career 5yrs 437 1236 178 294 121 378 60 8 43 140 37 12 .238 .319 .404 9 27 .304 n/a
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Harrison Bader (OF) STL - Jul. 10
https://www.rotowire.com/baseball/player.php?id=791268

Bader went 2-for-4 with a stolen base and a run scored in Saturday's 6-0 win over the Cubs.

ROTOWIRE RECOMMENDS: Bader singled and stole second in the fourth inning. He got aboard with another single in the fifth and scored on a Paul DeJong home run. Bader has seen regular playing time in July, going 9-for-34 (.265) with two home runs, seven RBI, four runs scored and a pair of stolen bases in his last nine games. The outfielder is slashing just .234/.308/.439 with seven long balls, 16 RBI, 12 runs scored and five steals through 120 plate appearances overall.

Alex Patton Alex
Jul 11

Harrison Bader (OF) STL - Apr. 16

https://www.rotowire.com/baseball/player.php?id=771207

Bader (forearm) continues to make progress but is still 10-to-14 days from being fully cleared to participate in all baseball activities, Katie Woo of The Athletic reports.

ROTOWIRE RECOMMENDS: Bader was originally expected to miss four weeks when he suffered a setback with his forearm in late March. He hasn't reportedly been dealing with any further setbacks, but he's behind that original timeline, as it will be roughly five weeks from the start of that timeframe when he's cleared for all baseball activities, let alone cleared to return to game action.

Alex Patton Alex
Apr 17

Bader will be out for at least four weeks with a forearm injury. It looks like Dylan Carlson has the job in centerfield. 

Tim McLeod tlmcleod
Mar 24
Article chock full of info to depress Bader's price, including Carlson getting time in CF.
John Thomas Roll2
Mar 23
Percentiles: Barrel 80 EV 10 xBA 6 xSLG 49 SO 7 BB 67 speed 98
Alex Patton Alex
Mar 15

Higher EV.....more HRs maybe.....which wouldn't change your BABIP to better or worse. 

van wilhoite LVW
Mar 8

They don't. At least as I read it. That might be why the highest EV batters don't have a higher BABIP. They get the sweet part of the bat on the ball but don't center it.

Mickey Mantle had the longest hang time on his infield flies of any batter ever.

Luckily Statcast can't disprove that.

Alex Patton Alex
Mar 8

I wonder what the exit velocity for a lot of pop flies are?

If the ball goes up at a 80 degree launch angle at 100 mph - they don't count it as a hard hit ball I assume.

Phil Ponebshek Texpope
Mar 8

So, just as Quality Starts can be many different things, so can Barrels.You can have a really high quality Barrel or a barely qualifying Barrel.

In an attempt to answer how well Barrels correlates with success, I sorted all batters last year with a minimum of 100 plate appearances by Barrel percent, then averaged their other measurements of success. Here's what I found.

Averages for the 20 hitters with the highest Barrel percents in 2020

Barrels 17% 

BABIP .307 

BA .265

SA .548

The 20 hitters ranged from Miguel Sano (Barrels 22.9%) to Rhys Hoskins (14.8%). As a group they averaged 17%.

They averaged a well above average BABIP, a well above average batting average, and a dramatically above average slugging average.

Not at all surprising. When you barrel the ball you get good results.

It gets more interesting when you look at hitters who simply hit the ball hard (at least 95 mph), without paying attention to launch angle.

Averages for the 20 hitters with the highest Hard Hit percents in 2020

Hard Hit 54% 

BABIP .299

BA .255

SA .511

A group ranging from Fernando Tatis Jr. (62.2%) to Jorge Soler (50.0%) hit the ball hard, on average 54% percent of the time, which is outstanding. And they got good results: nothing wrong with a .511 slugging average. Just not nearly as good as the 20 best barrel hitters (lots of duplicates, of course; Tatis was second to Sano in Barrels).

What about the 20 hitters who simply hit the ball harder -- every time they put the ball in play -- than anyone else?

Averages for the 20 hitters with the highest average Exit Velocity in 2020

EV 93.3

BABIP .294

BA .249

SA .492

Tatis heads this list (95.9 average EV); Ronald Acuna is number 20 (92.4). In between are some players you don't find on the other two (Miguel Cabrera, Joc Pederson, Kyle Schwarber).

It's a good group but not a great group. The batting average is only five points better than the major league average. The BABIP is a little under..

I wonder why that is?

Alex Patton Alex
Mar 8

From MLB.com:

https://www.mlb.com/glossary/statcast/barrel

The Barrel classification is assigned to batted-ball events whose comparable hit types (in terms of exit velocity and launch angle) have led to a minimum .500 batting average and 1.500 slugging percentage since Statcast was implemented Major League wide in 2015.

But similar to how Quality Starts have generally yielded a mean ERA much lower than the baseline of 4.50, the average Barrel has produced a batting mark and a slugging percentage significantly higher than .500 and 1.500, respectively. During the 2016 regular season, balls assigned the Barreled classification had a batting average of .822 and a 2.386 slugging percentage.

To be Barreled, a batted ball requires an exit velocity of at least 98 mph. At that speed, balls struck with a launch angle between 26-30 degrees always garner Barreled classification. For every mph over 98, the range of launch angles expands.

For example: A ball traveling 99 mph always earns 'Barreled' status when struck between 25-31 degrees. Add one more mph -- to reach 100 -- and the range grows another three degrees, to 24-33.

Every additional mph over 100 increases the range another two to three degrees until an exit velocity of 116 mph is reached. At that threshold, the Barreled designation is assigned to any ball with a launch angle between eight and 50 degrees.



GEOFF CRESAP SydThrift
Mar 7