Gerrit Cole New York Yankees

Age: 31 (September 08, 1990) | 6' 4" | 225lbs. | Throws: Right P-32
Tm Lg YEAR W L SV Hld G GS IP H HR BB SO ERA WHIP Rating BB/9 SO/9 BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
PIT A+ 2012 5 1 0 0 13 13 67.0 53 5 21 69 2.69 1.10 1.06 2.8 9.3 .286 n/a
PIT AA 2012 3 6 0 0 12 12 59.0 54 2 23 60 2.90 1.31 1.16 3.5 9.2 .328 n/a
PIT AAA 2012 1 0 0 0 1 1 6.0 6 0 1 7 4.50 1.17 1.08 1.5 10.5 .377 n/a
PIT AAA 2013 5 3 0 0 12 12 68.0 44 4 28 47 2.91 1.06 0.94 3.7 6.2 .216 n/a
PIT NL 2013 10 7 0 0 19 19 117.0 109 7 28 100 3.23 1.17 1.14 2.2 7.7 .307 49/25/26 12 12
PIT AAA 2014 3 1 0 0 4 4 22.1 21 1 5 16 2.01 1.16 1.12 2.0 6.4 .299 n/a
PIT NL 2014 11 5 0 0 22 22 138.0 127 11 40 138 3.65 1.21 1.18 2.6 9.0 .316 49/19/32 9 12
PIT NL 2015 19 8 0 0 32 32 208.0 183 11 44 202 2.60 1.09 1.06 1.9 8.7 .309 48/22/30 32 30
PIT AAA 2016 0 0 0 0 2 2 8.0 4 0 0 12 0.00 0.50 0.50 0.0 0.0 .275 n/a
PIT NL 2016 7 10 0 0 21 21 116.0 131 7 36 98 3.88 1.44 1.38 2.8 7.6 .351 46/25/29 2 5
PIT NL 2017 12 12 0 0 33 33 203.0 199 31 55 196 4.26 1.25 1.34 2.4 8.7 .309 46/21/34 11 15
HOU AL 2018 15 5 0 0 32 32 200.0 143 19 64 276 2.88 1.04 1.02 2.9 12.4 .301 36/21/43 31 33
HOU AL 2019 20 5 0 0 33 33 212.0 142 29 48 326 2.50 0.90 0.99 2.0 13.8 .294 40/20/39 50 47
NYY AL 2020 7 3 0 0 12 12 73.0 53 14 17 94 2.84 0.96 1.13 2.1 11.6 .259 37/20/43 40 37
NYY AL 2021 15 8 0 0 28 28 169.0 137 21 38 231 3.04 1.04 1.11 2.0 12.3 .321 43/17/41 31 30
Career 9yrs 116 63 0 0 232 232 1436.0 1224 150 370 1661 3.18 1.11 1.14 2.3 10.4 .310 n/a
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His ERA goes from 2.74 to 3.11 in today's fiasco in Florida. He was still throwing 99 in the sixth when everything fell apart.

Alex Patton Alex
Jul 29
Shuts out Astros
July 10, 2021
Cole (9-4) pitched a shutout, allowing just three hits and two walks while striking out 12 in nine innings in Saturday's 1-0 win over Houston.
ANALYSIS
The right-hander put an exclamation point on the end of the first half of the season, as all three hits he allowed were singles. Cole had notably struggled in his last six starts amid MLB's crackdown on sticky substances, but he was in his finest form Saturday, and he retired Yordan Alvarez on a 99 mph fastball to complete the shutout. The stellar outing lowered Cole's ERA to 2.68 with a 0.93 WHIP and 147:22 K:BB across 114 innings. He'll likely take the mound some point in next weekend's four-game series versus Boston coming out of the All-Star break.
Alex Patton Alex
Jul 11

Joel Sherman:

The results were Gerrit Cole. Two runs. Eight innings.

But this was a different Cole, operating under a new reality. Despite peak velocity, Cole did not hunt the top of the zone regularly with his fastball. In its place were the most changeups he had ever thrown in a major league game. Cole worked quicker, and on a windy night in Buffalo he rubbed up baseballs frequently and frantically as if a genie would pop out and grant him a few pitching wishes.

https://nypost.com/2021/06/17/yankees-gerrit-cole-pitching-differently-in-new-mlb-reality/

Alex Patton Alex
Jun 17

Up by 12 over second place, which is good. Third place in strikeouts. Not as good. Leagues that limit innings reward K rate more than bulk, so I have to run relievers out with high K rates.

I added Kimbrel and Iglesias this week, which should help my saves situation and add Ks per inning. But the big thing will be if ERA goes up for starters. All those teams making 120 starts instead of 70 will be at a disadvantage. I dream.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jun 16

How are you doing in wins?

Alex Patton Alex
Jun 15

Today's Washington Post: "Around June 3, reports surfaced that suggested the league was ready to begin stepped-up enforcement in accordance with its findings, though the specifics of the policy were not made clear. But the notion of enhanced enforcement appears to have been some kind of deterrent. In the 12 days before June 3, Major League hitters hit .233, walked 9.1 percent of the time, struck out 24.3 percent of the time, and experienced a home run-to-fly ball ratio of 12.7 percent. In the 12 days after, those same hitters hit .246, walked 8.4 percent of the time, struck out 23.3 percent of the time, and experienced a home run-to-fly ball ratio of 14.4 percent."

In one league I play in we have a 180 start maximum. By accident I ended up with lots of good starters and as of two weeks ago I'd used half my limit. This stat divergence makes me think I may have stumbled into a good strategy. We'll see.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Jun 15