Ben Oglivie Milwaukee Brewers

Age: 71 (February 11, 1949) | 6' 2" | 170lbs. | Bats: Left
Tm Lg YEAR G AB R H BB SO 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BA OBP SLG BB% SO% BABIP G/L/F % $4x4 $5x5
BOS AL 1971 14 38 2 10 0 5 3 0 0 4 0 0 .263 .263 .342 0 13 .303 n/a
BOS AL 1972 94 253 27 61 18 61 10 2 8 30 1 1 .241 .293 .391 7 22 .286 n/a
BOS AL 1973 58 147 16 32 9 32 9 1 2 9 1 1 .218 .269 .333 6 20 .261 n/a
DET AL 1974 92 252 28 68 34 38 11 3 4 29 12 3 .270 .353 .385 12 13 .300 n/a
DET AL 1975 100 332 45 95 16 62 14 1 9 36 11 8 .286 .319 .416 4 18 .325 n/a
DET AL 1976 115 305 36 87 11 44 12 3 15 47 9 4 .285 .313 .492 3 14 .288 n/a
DET AL 1977 132 450 63 118 40 80 24 2 21 61 9 9 .262 .325 .464 8 16 .276 n/a
ML4 AL 1978 128 469 71 142 52 69 29 4 18 72 11 7 .303 .370 .497 10 13 .322 n/a
ML4 AL 1979 139 514 88 145 48 56 30 4 29 81 12 5 .282 .343 .525 8 10 .268 n/a
ML4 AL 1980 156 592 94 180 54 71 26 2 41 118 11 9 .304 .362 .562 8 11 .284 n/a
ML4 AL 1981 107 400 53 97 37 49 15 2 14 72 2 2 .242 .310 .395 8 11 .241 n/a
ML4 AL 1982 159 602 92 147 70 81 22 1 34 102 3 5 .244 .326 .453 10 12 .232 n/a
ML4 AL 1983 125 411 49 115 60 64 19 3 13 66 4 6 .280 .371 .436 12 13 .298 n/a
ML4 AL 1984 131 461 49 121 44 56 16 2 12 60 0 6 .262 .327 .384 9 11 .276 n/a
ML4 AL 1985 101 341 40 99 37 51 17 2 10 61 0 2 .290 .354 .440 9 13 .307 n/a
ML4 AL 1986 103 346 31 98 30 33 20 1 5 53 1 2 .283 .334 .390 8 9 .295 n/a
Career 16yrs 1754 5913 784 1615 560 852 277 33 235 901 87 70 .273 .336 .450 8 13 .282 n/a
Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!


Wednesday, July 8Read in Browser.
Stathead logo & link to Stathead.com home page

Opening Day Games

NYY (0-0)
WSN (0-0)
7:08 pm
SFG (0-0)
LAD (0-0)
10:08 pm

See the full 2020 schedule at Baseball-Reference.com

Jim Ray HartYasmani GrandalBen OglivieRoy OswaltJohn Danks

July 8 All-Time Top Performers

Batters:

Jim Ray Hart* (SFG, 1970): 4-5, 1 HR, 7 RBI, 1 R, cycle

Yasmani Grandal* (LAD, 2016): 5-5, 3 HR, 6 RBI, 3 R

Ben Oglivie* (MIL, 1979): 3-3, 3 HR, 4 RBI, 3 R

Stan Musial (STL, 1962): 3-4, 3 HR, 4 RBI, 3 R

Andruw Jones (TEX, 2009): 3-5, 3 HR, 4 RBI, 3 R

Joe Morgan (HOU, 1965): 6-6, 2 HR, 3 RBI, 4 R, 1 SB

Ken Griffey Jr. (CIN, 2000): 4-6, 2 HR, 8 RBI, 2 R

Troy Neel (OAK, 1993): 4-5, 2 HR, 7 RBI, 2 R

Carlton Fisk (CHW, 1985): 3-3, 2 HR, 5 RBI, 3 R

David Dellucci (TEX, 2004): 3-4, 2 HR, 5 RBI, 3 R


Alex Patton Alex

In case you're wondering what the hey we are doing to amuse ourselves in the XFL...

Alex Patton Alex
Apr 30

I wrote up something a little rambly about the 1982 draft. You can read it here.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Apr 22

I knew I was high in BA and ERA WHIP. Was fine in pitching, but chose to ditch BA for SB when I should have been pounding HR and RBI. None of us were really looking at the category stats until the last 10 rounds, and by that time it was too late.

I'm in favor of an auction for research purposes. But it won't really settle anything. At least not until we do it a bunch of times.

Peter Kreutzer Rotoman
Apr 22

I don't have a clue how to do a draft, much less a mixed league.  It's mind boggling to me. AL had 14 teams (but more hitters on each roster) and full league was 12, but NL was 12.  What was a full league for auction purposes?

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Apr 22

But Alex got 11 points in Batting Average ... that doesn't seem to be what doomed him ...

On the surface, to me it looks like taking 3 pitchers in the first 4 picks explains the result (too few hitting points)

The winning team seems the most balanced ... didn't win any category ... didn't even come in 2nd in any category ...

Howard Lynch LynchMob
Apr 21

'Twas a real pleasure even though I only tied for 4th. Just goes to show, it ain't easy even when all player risk is removed. Maybe we'll try an auction next time but I rather doubt that would be better - not in a mixed league anyway. Allocation, allocation, allocation.

Gene McCaffrey GeneM
Apr 21

From your early books I remember one key thing that has stuck with me forever, although  I don't think it was explicitly stated. Wade Boggs always earned a lot despite his not hitting HR and driving in Runs nor stealing bases.  It was all because his Avg was so good and had considerable value.  Oglivie's average is quite the opposite at .244.

Sometimes I overdo it for batting average, but it's all calculated, so how wrong could it be?

Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Apr 21

He was my undoing last night in the XFL 1982 retro draft (Doubt Wars thread).

The reason goes all the way back to 1980. In 1980 I was teaching 7th and 8th grade English at a private school in Manhattan. One afternoon in the fall the science teacher came to my desk in the common area and said he and six or seven students were going to replay the just-completed season on the computer in the science room, using a program he had written over the summer. Did I want a team? I did.

We drew straws and I lucked out with the second pick. I took Mike Schmidt (George Brett was first). The second hitter I picked was Ben Oglivie. Then I picked seven other hitters who walked a lot. 

In my lineup, Schmidt batted cleanup and Oglivie eighth.

My team was called the Tanks and by Christmas, around the halfway point (we played triple-headers), the Tanks had rolled into a commanding lead.

It was a weird school — few actual classes, lots of free time for teachers as well as students — and after Christmas, because of all the shouting, we were told to move the computer into the music room. The music teacher, who spent most of her time in the lounge, now spent more time in the lounge.

Back to last night...

My first two picks were pitchers. Why not? In a retro draft pitchers are not unreliable. And nine of them determine half of the standings.

My third pick was Damaso Garcia. $6 better than the next best second baseman in 1982 (Steve Sax).

My fourth pick was another pitcher.

My fifth pick was Bo Diaz. Position scarcity. Four better already taken, $2 drop to the next.

By the sixth round, it was time to take a serious bopper in the outfield before they all disappeared.

I tried a couple of names.

Taken.

Almost never in a real life auction does this happen to me, because in a real life auction I have the lists printed out and it’s easy to cross off names. Where I am sheltering now I don’t have a printer; working with a Google spreadsheet and my own spreadsheet, I wasn’t keeping up.

Typed in another outfielder on the Google spreadsheet.

“Taken,” said someone on my phone, which was on speaker.

“Taken,” popped up on Todd Zola’s clever Google sheet, as if I doubted.

I alt tabbed back to my spreadsheet and tried a different tab: H R&R.

H R&R ranked all hitters in 1982 by the total of runs and ribbies. I thought this might be handy in the end game, when dollar values might not be all that helpful. When you have enough steals you have enough steals. H R&R ranked hitters by bulk production, which is what 5x5, in the end, is about.

Very, very high on the list in this tab was Ben Oglivie with 194 (92 & 102).

I typed in Ben Oglivie’s name and it was accepted.

Then, while the Wise Guy made his pick, I switched tabs to position and rank to get a better look at Ben.

The Wise Guy picked Larry Herndon. 

I glanced below Ben on my list to find Herndon’s stats, didn't see him; looked up.

Up further.

Further.

Finally there was Larry Herndon, the 12th best outfielder on the list, $22.

And there was Ben Oglivie, the 41st best outfielder. $15.

All I can tell you is he didn’t hit .244 in 1980. 

Alex Patton Alex
Apr 21