Recent Comments

Welcome! You are invited to wander around and read all of the comments that have been posted here at Patton & Co., but as soon as you register you can see the bid limits that Alex, Peter and Mike propose for each player, and you can post your own comments. Registering is free, so please join us!
Has obviously made a splash in his first few days with the big club, and has probably been picked up by many fantasy teams. It says here it's all likely to be downhill from here -- I doubt that he's really any better than Ortmeier or Schierholz.
mike fenger mike
Apr 17 '08
Eric Hinske Arizona Diamondbacks
M-V-P! M-V-P!

Mike Landau ML-
Apr 17 '08
Joe Borowski Cleveland Guardians
I wonder why they don't just go with Kobayashi as the closer since that's what he did in Japan. The don't want Betancourt wind up like Riske a few years ago.
Tom Ryan toshiro
Apr 16 '08
Erik Bedard Tampa Bay Rays
Interesting article on Bedard, which postulates bad things about his future:

http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/fantasy/article/erik-bedard-windup-worries/
Tom Ryan toshiro
Apr 16 '08
Ben Sheets Atlanta Braves
If he keeps it up, and I see no reason he can't, he will be in consideration for the Cy Young award. That being said, he is one pitch, or step, away from the 15 day disabled list. Risky, no doubt, but when on, he is outstanding.
Michael Thomas ROTOMAVIN
Apr 16 '08
Mike Piazza New York Mets
Do not believe the stories about Piazza on juice. This is the first we have heard about out here in So. California, and Piazza is still "that man" here. Shame he was ever traded...sure Hall of Famer, and will not go in as a Dodger, unless his buddy Tommy Lasorda pulls some magic.

If you look at Piazza when he came up, and now, he looks the same (body wise), only older. He was never "cut" and his power was to Right Center, not a pure pull hitter.

As good as a player that he was, I think he might have been underated. That is what happens when you get traded to three teams in one season.
Michael Thomas ROTOMAVIN
Apr 16 '08
Dave Roberts Los Angeles Dodgers
Alex: We have to stick a fork in this guy, but we find no thread for Bowker? He has had a great start for a player who was not rated very highly.

Let's get his name in the data base.
Michael Thomas ROTOMAVIN
Apr 16 '08
Not to spam, but as a side note, I'm seriously wondering if he calls his own game (doesn't depend much on the catcher to call the shots)? He strikes me as the kind of guy that asks the skipper to call his own game.
Shawn Douglas ShawnD
Apr 16 '08
Wow! The guy seems to be quite cerebral! I love this kind of player... someone who isn't content with only his "stuff" but also digs in and finds out more "why". Thanks for the link, garryoak. It's stuff like this that keeps bringing me back to this site.

Shawn Douglas ShawnD
Apr 16 '08
There was a great little Q/A done by Tim Dierkes (presumably) at: http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2008/01/brian-bannist-2.html

I found it a facinating little read, and quite cool to see how, as a pitcher, Bannister integrates statistical research (and theories a la DIPS) into his approach in order to improve his game. Seems like an intelligent and thoughtful guy...enjoy.

(btw, I have no affiliation to mlbtraderumors.com)
Garry Oak garryoak
Apr 16 '08
A few weeks ago Bannister had an on-line Q/A with someone about DIPS ERA. I think the discussion was actually with Voros McCracken, the man who developed it, then fell out of the sabermetric community for a few years for various reasons.

Further research has refined DIPS and does suggest that some pitchers do have some impact on BIP Avg, but very few.
Eugene Freedman EugeneFreed
Apr 16 '08
I just read an article by Al Melchior at CBSSports that was a little interesting. Al says, "He not only knows what his H/BIP was last year, but contrary to what the research suggests, he thinks his low rate was neither random nor accidental. Bannister thinks he knows how to keep hit balls from becoming base hits. It's not that Bannister is ignorant of the research findings; he is actually a student of them. Through his own statistical research, he concludes that his H/BIP, ERA and WHIP could easily remain at their 2007 levels."

And then words from Bannister:

"I think a lot of fans underestimate how much time I spend working with statistics to improve my performance on the field ... I don't claim to be able to beat the .300 (H/BIP) average year in and year out at the Major League level. However, I also don't feel that every pitcher is hopelessly bound to that .300 number for his career if he takes some steps to improve his odds -- which is what pitching is all about."

My initial reaction is to sound the phoney balogna alarm. Ok, so the article goes on to state the purposefuly tries to manipulate his H/BIP with pitch selection and the induction of weak swings in two-strike counts. But doesn't this lead to the argument about how much control the pitcher has over BIP?
Shawn Douglas ShawnD
Apr 16 '08
Hank Aaron Milwaukee Brewers
Maybe I was just a curmudgeon about it, but even in the late 60s and early 70s I preferred Frank Robinson to Bad Henry as my NL All-Star right fielder. I'm sure some of it was the intensity that Frank showed, but I also think that Frank might have helped his teams win just a little bit more.
mike fenger mike
Apr 16 '08
Just to add my two cents, I've always felt Al Simmons is possibly the most underrated greatest player of all time.

For the ten year period of '25-'34, he was one of the most feared hitters of the decade.

During that ten year period he finished in the top 5 in the following categories:

BA - 8 times
HR - 7 times
RBI - 8 times
SLG - 8 times
OPS - 5 Times

Maybe even more impressive, he finished in the top 10 in EACH of those categories EACH year during that decade.

At the time he retired, he was 5th all-time in HR's, 6th all-time in RBI, 13th all-time in hits and a lifetime BA of .334

He was a very good defensive OF'er as well.

They say he would have been better if he didn't smoke so much.

People always bring up the names of Aaron and Musial when talking of the all-time greats. How many times is Simmons name uttered?

Keith Cromer Slyke
Apr 16 '08
It's also hard with Honus that virtually no one alive ever saw him play. The numbers, compared to his era, certainly are great.
Mike Gianella MikeG
Apr 16 '08
Joe Borowski Cleveland Guardians
DL'd.

Along with Moylan (Acosta is next).

Around and around they go. What would we do without the fun that closers provide year in and year out?
Gary Cruciani Megary
Apr 15 '08
Yep, something's gotta give here. Kobayashi or Betancourt, that is the question. I'm inclined to agree with Neaux and Jaffee. Wedge probably considers Betancourt too valuable as the set-up guy, and Perez as the situational lefty, to move either to closer if he has an alternative. So my guess is Kobayashi will get a crack. But it is a guess. He'll have a short leash if he does get a shot, I'd imagine. And if Betancourt is moved in at any point, he'll likely do just fine. He's been basically untouchable in recent memory.
Paul Benninghoff PaulB
Apr 15 '08
This may be of no surprise to anyone, but I watched Joe last night, and he didn't have even minor league stuff. His fastball was topping at 83. When Manny came to the plate, he saw a batting practice pitcher, and he used a batting practice swing to club a homerun of 400+. No matter what Wedge said after the game, I don't expect to see Borowski again -- at least for quite some time. My first thought for a replacement is Kobayashi.
David Molyneaux NeauxBrainr
Apr 15 '08
Hank Aaron Milwaukee Brewers
Speaking of whom, and the late start to Hans's career:

http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/article/superdupersubs-part-1-1901-1940/

or

http://tinyurl.com/57rxwp
T.J. Rohr TJRohr
Apr 15 '08
another Canadian here who saw him pitch live 5 or 6 times between this year and last. He rarely hits 90 on the gun, but gets a lot of movement on his fastballs and as sbud51 said, has a great change which he throws consistently at 80-81. Has great command of his pitches, even if there's only '2'. Then again, his rotation leader (Halladay) gets by quite successfully on what sometimes feels like one pitch. The movement on Marcum's fastball (like Halladay) makes it difficult for hitters to square up on-- more effective than a few extra velocity ticks. Surprisingly, the Jays may have the best rotation in the AL, and Marcum is a big reason why.
Garry Oak garryoak
Apr 15 '08

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